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The subject index / Commission for St. Petersburg Construction

Commission for St. Petersburg Construction


Categories / Architecture/Urban Planning/Architectural-planning Organizations and Institutions

COMMISSION OF ST. PETERSBURG CONSTRUCTION was the state institution organized on 10 July 1737 to regulate the city development following the fires on Admiralteisky Island. It was headed by K.A. Minich with P.M. Eropkin as chief architect. The commission composed urban planning projects, was in charge of assigning plots for streets and squares (as a result of the Commission work, Nevsky Prospect, Sadovaya Street, etc. were named for the first time). To facilitate the development works, the city was divided into five parts, supervised by respective architects: Admiralteiskaya (M.G. Zemtsov, I.K. Korobov), Peterburgskaya (Zemtsov), Vasilievskaya (G. Trezzini), Moskovskaya and Liteinaya (I.Y. Schumacher). The Commission also developed plans of Okhtinskaya Settlement and Vyborgskaya Side. Most part of the projects prepared by the Commission was implemented (creation of the three-axes composition of Neva left-bank part of the city, etc.). The commission was abolished in 1746.

A. A. Alexeev.

Persons
Eropkin Peter Mikhailovich
Korobov Ivan Kuzmich
Minich Christoph Antonovich (Burghard Christoph), Count
Schumacher Iogann Yakob
Trezzini Giuseppe
Zemtsov Mikhail Grigorievich

Addresses
Nevsky prospect/Saint Petersburg, city
Sadovaya St./Saint Petersburg, city
Петербургская часть
Литейная часть
Васильевская часть
Адмиралтейская часть
Выборгская сторона
Московская часть

Bibliographies
Малиновский К. В. Комиссия о Санкт-Петербургском строении // Три века Санкт-Петербурга: Энцикл. СПб., 2001

Chronograph
1737
1739



Administrative Division

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION, division of the city into separate parts (districts) governed by their own administrative organs subordinated to the city administration

Central Police Office

CENTRAL POLICE OFFICE, the city administration body of St. Petersburg in the 18th century. It was instituted attached to Petersburg Chief of Police General according to the decree on city police establishment issued on June 7, 1718

General Plans for the Development of Petersburg-Leningrad

GENERAL PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF PETERSBURG-LENINGRAD. One the first projects of St. Petersburg planning dates back to 1709-12. According to it, the city centre should be situated at Kotlin Island and was to be connected to outer parts of the

Gorokhovaya Street

GOROKHOVAYA STREET, runs from Admiralteysky Avenue to Zagorodny Avenue, crossing the Moika River (Krasny Bridge), Griboedova Canal (Kamenny Bridge) and the Fontanka River (Semenovsky Bridge)

Kolokolnaya Street

KOLOKOLNAYA STREET, located between Vladimirsky Avenue and Marata Street. Constructed in the 1740s according to a project by the St. Petersburg Construction Commission

Kolomenskaya Street

KOLOMENSKAYA STREET, located between Kuznechny Lane and Volokolamsky Lane. The road was constructed in the 1740s, according to a project by the St. Petersburg Construction Commission

Korobov I.K. (1701-1747), architect

KOROBOV Ivan Kuzmich (1700 or 1701-1747), architect and engineer, a representative of Petrine Baroque. He studied in Holland and Belgium as a retainer of Peter the Great (1718-1727). After he returned to St

Maps and Atlases (entry)

MAPS AND ATLASES. The first known Russian hand-written picture of the Neva River mouth and the territory adjoining the Gulf of Finland dates back to the late 17th century

Munnich B. K. (1683-1767), Engineer, Governor General 1728-34

MUNNICH Christofor Antonovich (Burchard Kristoff) (1683-1767, St. Petersburg), Count (1728), statesman and military figure, General Field Marshal (1732). He was German by birth, came to Russian service in 1721

Pochtamtskaya Street

POCHTAMTSKAYA STREET, between St. Isaac's Square and Konnogvardeisky Lane. The road was built in the first quarter of the 18th century, in the 1730s it was known as Pushkarskaya Street (after Pushkarskaya, meaning Artillerymen, settlement)

Police Units

POLICE UNITS, the main units of administrative and territorial division of St. Petersburg in the 18th - early 20th centuries. In 1737, at the suggestion of the Commission on Construction in St

Povarskoy Lane

POVARSKOY LANE (originally called Basmannaya Street; in the 1770s, it was renamed Povarskaya Street, remained as such until the 1790s), between Stremyannaya Street and Kolokolnaya Street. It was built in the 1740s, following the designs of the St

Razyezzhaya Street

RAZYEZZHAYA STREET (in the first half of the 19th century, it was also referred to as Chernyshev Lane), between Zagorodny Avenue and Ligovsky Avenue. The road was named in 1739, constructed in the 1740s following the designs of St

Reference and Standard Plans (entry)

REFERENCE AND STANDARD PLANS. Used since St. Petersburg's first founding years to erect residential and service buildings. Because of a lack of materials, in the 1700s-10s, most cottages were from plastered bricks or logs

Repina Square

REPINA SQUARE (in the middle of the 19th century - Kalinkinskaya Square), between Rimskogo-Korsakova Avenue and embankments of the Fontanka River and Griboedova Canal

Sadovaya Street

SADOVAYA STREET (from 1923 to 1944 - Third of July Street, the section from Italyanskaya Street up to Ekaterininsky Canal; from the 1730s to 1887, it was known as Bolshaya Sadovaya Street; the part from Moika River Embankment to Italyanskaya Street

Saltykov V.F. Chief of police General in 1734-42

SALTYKOV Vasily Fedorovich (1675-1751), statesman, general en chef (1741), adjutant-general (1734). He served at Preobrazhensky Life Guards Regiment. In 1732-42 Petersburg Chief of Police General

Sennaya Square

SENNAYA SQUARE (from 1952 to 1991 - Mira Square), located at the intersection of Sadovaya Street (some buildings numbered) and Moskovsky Avenue. The St. Petersburg Construction Commission proposed the construction of an extensive square on this site

Territory of the City (entry)

TERRITORY OF THE CITY. In the 16th century, settlements subordinated to Spassky, Gorodensky, Nikolsky, Izhorsky and Vozdvizhensky Korboselsky churchyards of Great Novgorod existed on the territory of the present-day St. Petersburg

Toponymy of St. Petersburg

TOPONYMY OF ST. PETERSBURG, a corpus of names of geographical points situated on the territory of St. Petersburg. Names of rivers, islands, and villages located on the city's future territory appeared long before its foundation

Turgeneva Square

TURGENEVA SQUARE, Pokrovskaya Square until 1923, at the intersection of Sadovaya Street (the numeration of the buildings on the square follows the numerical order set on Sadovaya Street) and Angliisky Avenue; the square is the centre of Kolomna area

Vladimirskaya Square

VLADIMIRSKAYA SQUARE, in 1739 - Torgovaya Square, in 1923-50 - Nakhimsona Square after revolutionary S. M. Nakhimson (1885-1918). The square is bounded by Zagorodny Avenue, Vladimirsky Avenue, Kuznechny Lane, Kolokolnaya Street

Vladimirsky Avenue

VLADIMIRSKY AVENUE, a part of Liteiny Avenue in 1739-1860 also named Vladimirskaya Street from the late 18th century and Nakhimsona Avenue in 1918-44. It runs between Vladimirskaya Square and Nevsky Avenue

Zagorodny Avenue

ZAGORODNY AVENUE, running from Vladimirskaya Square to Moskovsky Avenue. The avenue was laid in the 1740s according to a project planned by the Commission for the Building of St

Zemtsov M.G. (1688-1743), architect.

ZEMTSOV Mikhail Grigoryevich (1688-1743, St. Petersburg), architect, graphic artist, theorist of architecture, representative of the early Baroque. He studied at the Armoury Printing House School in Moscow. He worked in St